Archives for posts with tag: Tule

Stress levels…

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Oh boy. May started with a bit of a blow. The vendor of the flat I was buying changed her mind about selling.  So the surveyor’s fee, the legal costs already incurred (all my legal work had been done) left me over £1000 out of pocket. Then there was the time wasted by the decorator who had given me estimates for repainting the place, the carpet fitter measuring the place, all that time wasted trying to decide on colours…

And yet… The llama is not ironic.

Cost and time wasting aside, she did me a favour. I have found a flat I like much more, in immaculate condition, in a better location and without the need for expensive decoration or new carpets. And it has a little courtyard garden that I can see filled with plants. I’ve already started a list with wisteria and honeysuckle at the top. (The honeysuckles at Fielding Towers are about to bloom and I am really going to miss them.)

Oh, and then my vacuum cleaner died – of old age – this week. Just what you need when you’re trying to keep on top of everything. and my stick cleaner is also on it’s last legs. I looked at replacement and couldn’t believe the price! Nevertheless I had to bite the bullet and I  ve gone for a cylinder job recomended by my daughter to replace both.

Interior decorating

4892510-purple-wisteria-wisteria-japonica-growing-along-a-fence-in-franceNothing to do, at least until I move in and live with what I’ve got. Well, it’s just down to deciding exactly which trestle table I want for my workspace – the table I have just isn’t big enough. The curtain material I chose is still the one I want, but my favourite curtains (bought only last year at vast expense) will fit either my bedroom or study, which is a bonus.

My sale? Well, it’s moving, but rather as a glacier moves but I’m going on holiday at the beginning of next month and if I haven’t moved by then (if no further than my daughter’s spare bedroom) I might begin to crack.

Writing?

Well, again in the manner of a glacier. Stress is not conducive to writing as I’ve learned in the past. And anything you do write is likely to be pants but I’m thinking a lot.

Giveaway…

31263256_1616328918488216_6159892561788928000_nRoyalWedding-FieldingLARGE-300x450 (1)I’m also running a lovely little giveaway in conjunction with the Tule #royalweddinginvitation series and our own royal wedding event. If you want to throw your name into the hat, leave a comment on my Facebook page.

I’m also taking part in the #romanceauthorchallenge on Instagram. No prizes, but a great opportunity to see a picture post from some great authors every day.

 

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Royal Wedding Invitations

 

a1b54294e9a74f055787892cf844cca6When Sophie Weston, Jessica Hart (Pamela Hartshorne), Anne McAllister and I looked around for a setting for our fictional Cotswold village for our Invitation to a Royal Wedding quartet, I immediately  thought of Castle Combe – the prettiest village in England. Allegedly. (Other villages are also extremely pretty!)

I’d had lunch at the Manor House Hotel with the Bath and Wiltshire Romantic Novelists’ Association chapter when Jill Mansell gave a talk there.

She’d used the hotel in her book, Daisy’s Place and I knew it would work very well for Hasebury Hall, the childhood home of Hope Kennard, Sophie’s heroine (The Prince’s Bride).

Sophie, Jessica, Anne and I had a day out walking the ground of “our” village on a gloriously sunny spring day and had a wonderful lunch there, purely in the necessity of research, you understand. Research is not all about surfing the ‘net and dusty libraries!

Jessica, who’d been the first out of the traps with a draft ms, had named the church  where the wedding was to take place St Philip and All Angels and when we went into the beautiful church in Castle Combe, one of the first things we saw was this array of angels on either side of the aisle.

One of those spine-tingly magic moments for a writer.

We found a suitably ancient monument where our bride’s ancestor would have been laid to rest and imagined a stained glass window bearing his coat of arms,

There was some discussion about the differences between a US wedding and one taking place in the UK – the bridesmaids follow the bride in the UK. The fact that the bride and groom (and their witnesses) disappear into the vestry after the service to sign the register. Details that may not be used but are important to know.

We walked around the churchyard, working out the where the television people would put their cherry picker – my heroine’s concern – and, because that’s what you can do when you’ve created your own location, we turned it around so that the heroine, walking from her family home, would not have to walk all around the graveyard.

There were other important locations. This is the market cross, Ally’s home, and the Three Bells where Ally was working when Fredrik arrived unexpectedly.

Actually the pub isn’t in Castle Combe but in the equally pretty village of  Lacock and is the pub where our local Romantic Novelists’ Chapter meet for supper once in a while.

And the last picture refers to something that our village and Castle Combe have in common. They are both used as locations for films and tv dramas.

Castle Combe was recently used in the film War Horse.

 

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